Poodle versus Wirehaired Pointing Griffon. Final Verdict on Which is a Better Pet.

Last updated on September 27th, 2021 at 03:15 pm


Poodle versus Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

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Poodle Versus Wirehaired Pointing Griffon: Introduction

Are you thinking of getting a new pet dog, and you have narrowed down your choices to the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon? Well, you have come to the right place. Because in this article, we will provide you a detailed comparison of these two dog breeds to help you decide which of the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon better suits you.

We will provide you a detailed discussion and comparison of dog attributes such as intelligence, price, general health, friendliness, etc, for both the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon.

Furthermore, we will let you know which one of the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon is better suited for new dog owners, for owners with kids, for owners that live in apartments, for owners with dog allergies, etc.

Importantly, we did some analysis and calculation and we obtained a number that we call the Better-Pet Score™ for both the Poodle and for the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon. The dog breed with the higher Better-Pet score is the `better` pet. We hope that these Better-Pet Scores will provide you more insight into deciding which pet to get between the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon.

Our only goal here is to help you make a well-thought-out decision on your next long-term companion, be it the Poodle or the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

Note that there are 3 types of Poodles:

  • The Standard Poodle
  • The Miniature Poodle
  • The Toy Poodle
  • However, these 3 poodle `types` are basically the same. The only difference between them is size. Standard Poodles are big, toy poodles are small, and miniature poodles are medium-sized.

    Read more about the subtle differences between the standard poodle vs. miniature poodle here and the toy poodle versus miniature poodle here.

    In addition, we have articles on the detailed comparisons of the poodle to every other dog breed. Check out our articles on poodle versus other dog breeds here.

    Poodle versus Wirehaired Pointing Griffon: Overview

    A very important difference between the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon is the size difference between the two dog breeds. The Poodle is a large-sized dog while the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon is a medium-sized dog.

    Furthermore, the Poodle belongs to the Companion Dogs group. Companion Dogs were bred to be companions for humans. Their main goal in life is to be with people, and they will be very sad if left to themselves for long hours day after day.

    On the other hand, the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon belongs to the Sporting Dogs group. Sporting Dogs were bred to help hunters catch and retrieve feathered game. Some sporting dog breeds such as Retrievers, which were built for swimming, were bred to hunt waterfowl in water. Whereas sporting dog breeds like setters, spaniels, and pointing breeds were bred to hunt quail, pheasant, and other game birds nest on grasslands. Many Sporting Group breeds have thick, water-repellent coats that protect them from harsh hunting conditions.

    Poodle versus Wirehaired Pointing Griffon: Comparison Table

    The table below compares the Poodle to the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon based on different important factors such as Price, Health, Kid-friendliness, etc.

    When a dog breed scores higher for a factor than the other dog breed, the box of the breed that scores higher is shaded green and the box of the breed that scores lower is shaded red. When there is no difference between the breeds for a particular factor then the box is shaded gray for both pets. Also, when the factor is not important in picking a pet, or when the factor cannot be compared between two pets, the box for the factor is shaded gray for both pets

    Most of the factors in the table for each dog breed are ranked on a scale of 1 to 5. “1” means “worst”, and “5” means “best”.

    However, some factors such as “Price”, “Average Lifespan”, etc. cannot be on a scale of 1 to 5, so they are not on a scale of 1 to 5 in the comparison table.

    Later in this article, we will further explain each factor as it applies to the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

    Factor Poodle Wirehaired Pointing Griffon
    Tolerates Being Alone 1/5 1/5
    Does NOT Shed 5/5 5/5
    Does NOT Drool 5/5 5/5
    Easy To Groom 1/5 3/5
    Life Span 12 to 15 years 10 to 14 years
    General Health 2/5 4/5
    Low Prey Drive 4/5 2/5
    Does NOT Bark or Howl 4/5 2/5
    Tolerates Cold Weather 3/5 4/5
    Tendency NOT to Wander 3/5 2/5
    Calmness/ Low Vigor 3/5 3/5
    Weight
  • Standard Poodle: 38 to 70 pounds
  • Miniature Poodle: 10 and 20 pounds
  • Toy Poodle: 4.8 to 11.6 pounds
  • 50 to 60 pounds
    Easygoing 2/5 2/5
    Tolerates Hot Weather 4/5 3/5
    Dog Friendly 4/5 4/5
    Friendly Toward Strangers 4/5 5/5
    Potential NOT to Gain Weight 2/5 3/5
    Does NOT chew on things 2/5 3/5
    NOT Rambunctious 2/5 1/5
    Minimal Exercise Needs 2/5 2/5
    Adapts Well To Apartment Living 5/5 1/5
    Good For Novice Owners 5/5 3/5
    Affectionate With Family 5/5 5/5
    Kid-Friendly 5/5 5/5
    Easy To Train 5/5 5/5
    Intelligence 5/5 5/5
    Potential For Playfulness 5/5 5/5
    Height
  • Standard Poodle: 24 to 27 inches
  • Miniature Poodle: 10 to 15 inches
  • Toy Poodle: less than 10 inches
  • 20 to 24 inches tall at the shoulder
    Average Lifespan 13.5 years 12.0 years
    Average Price
  • Standard Poodle: $2000
  • Miniature Poodle: $2530
  • Toy Poodle: $2840
  • $1320
    Price Range
  • Standard Poodle: $1400 – $2500
  • Miniature Poodle: $1500 – $3000
  • Toy Poodle: $1900 – $3500
  • $1000 – $1800
    Common Health Problems and Recommended Health Tests
  • Eye Examination
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Patellar Luxation
  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) DNA Test
  • Autoimmune thyroiditis
  • Elbow Dysplasia
  • Eye Examination- after the age of 12 months
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Popularity out of 200 Dog Breeds 7 67
    Intelligence Rank (out of 130 Dog Breeds) 2 46

    *Data from dogtime.com, OFA.org (The Orthopedic Foundation for Animals), petcalculator.com, wikipedia.org, ATTS.org (the American Temperament Test Society)

    Next, we added the scores of the factors that can be added together for the Poodle in the table (that is, `Ease of Grooming` score + `General Health` score + `Calmness` score + …etc) and we compared it to the corresponding total score for the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon. We call these total scores the Better-Pet Scores, as we mentioned earlier. We called this score the Better-Pet score because the better dog breed will have a higher score. This is because the pet will the higher score will have minimal needs and be easier to have as a pet.

    The Better-Pet score for a Poodle is 88 out of 125 while the Better-Pet score for a Wirehaired Pointing Griffon is 83 out of 125.

    Based on their Better-Pet scores, the Poodle is a better pet than the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon. So, you should get a Poodle!

    The Most Remarkable Differences Between the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

    Below is a list of where the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon are most different:

  • Poodles adapt well to apartment living. However, Wirehaired Pointing Griffons do not adapt well to apartment living.
  • The Similarities Between the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

    The Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon are very similar in certain aspects. Below is the list of where the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon are most similar:

  • Both the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon do not like to be left alone.
  • Both the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon do not shed a lot. They are good for people with dog allergies.
  • Both the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon do not have the tendency to drool.
  • Both the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon are easily disturbed by noise in their environments. They are sensitive to human tone. They will understand the tone of your voice when you try to correct their behaviors with a firm tone.
  • Both the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon can tolerate hot weather.
  • Both the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon get along well with other dogs.
  • Both the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon are very friendly towards strangers.
  • Both the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon gain weight easily. You need to pay careful attention to what you feed them.
  • Both the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon are prone to nip and chew at things.
  • Both the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon have very high energy levels. They need a lot of exercise time to release their high energy.
  • Both the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon require a lot of exercise. They are good for owners who like to exercise.
  • Both the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon are great family dogs. They are very affectionate with family.
  • Both the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon get along well with kids. They are kid-friendly.
  • Both the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon are very easy to train.
  • Both the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon are highly intelligent.
  • Both the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon are very playful.
  • Size (Weight and Height) of Poodle versus Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

    Now, let us discuss the difference in size between the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon.

    Poodles come in three main size categories. These three size categories are referred to as the three varieties of the poodle. Poodles of different varieties are basically the same except for their size differences. The poodle varieties based on size categorization are:

  • Standard Poodles: Standard Poodles are the biggest of the poodle varieties. Adult Standard Poodles are 24 inches to 27 inches tall and weigh between 38 pounds and 70 pounds. To learn more about Standard Poodle Growth, Weight, and Height, check out our article on Standard Poodle growth, weight and height.
  • Miniature Poodles: Miniature Poodles are mid-sized poodles. An adult miniature poodle grows to weigh between 10 and 20 pounds (4.5 kg to 9 kg) and stands between 10 to 15 inches tall (25.4 cm to 38.1 cm). To learn more about Miniature Poodle Growth, Weight and Height, check out our article on Miniature Poodle growth, weight and height.
  • Toy Poodles: The Toy Poodle is the smallest official member of the poodle club. Although there is a smaller poodle variety that is smaller than the toy poodle. This tiny poodle variety is called the micro/teacup poodle. However, this micro/teacup poodle size category is not recognized by the official poodle association, The Poodle Club of America. Adult toy poodles are no more than ten inches tall withers. In weight, a toy poodle will grow to be about 4.8 to 11.6 pounds in weight. To learn more about Toy Poodle Growth, Weight and Height, check out our article on Toy Poodle growth, weight and height.
  • There is another variety of poodle that is not recognized in the USA but is recognized in Europe. This poodle size variety is called the Moyen Poodle. In size, the Moyen Poodle is smaller than the Standard poodle but bigger than the miniature poodle.

    See below the figure that compares the different poodle sizes:

    Poodle Sizes

    On the other hand, Wirehaired Pointing Griffons weigh 50 to 60 pounds when fully grown. Wirehaired Pointing Griffons are 20 to 24 inches tall at the shoulder when fully grown.

    Price of Poodle versus Price of Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

    The average price of the Standard Poodle puppy is $2000. The price of the Standard Poodle typically ranges from $1400 – $2500. However, the price of a Standard Poodle can be as low as $200 and as high as $20000. We obtained this price information by reviewing the prices of 2527 Standard Poodle puppies listed for sale from various sources.
    The average price of the Miniature Poodle puppy is $2530. The price of the Miniature Poodle typically ranges from $1500 – $3000. However, the price of a Miniature Poodle can be as low as $350 and as high as $20000. We obtained this price information by reviewing the prices of 1192 Miniature Poodle puppies listed for sale from various sources.
    The average price of the Toy Poodle puppy is $2840. The price of the Toy Poodle typically ranges from $1900 – $3500. However, the price of a Toy Poodle can be as low as $450 and as high as $40000. We obtained this price information by reviewing the prices of 874 Toy Poodle puppies listed for sale from various sources.

    To know about standard poodle prices and standard poodle buying advice, check out our article on standard poodle cost.

    To know about miniature poodle prices, check out this article on miniature poodle price.

    To learn more about toy poodle price and for toy poodle buying advice, check out this article on toy poodle price.

    The average price of the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon puppy is $1320. The price of the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon typically ranges from $1000 – $1800. However, the price of a Wirehaired Pointing Griffon can be as low as $300 and as high as $2825. We obtained this price information by collecting and reviewing the prices of 62 Wirehaired Pointing Griffon puppies listed for sale from various sources.

    The Poodle is more expensive than the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon.

    Poodle Wirehaired Pointing Griffon
    Average Price $2300 $1320
    Price Range $1500 to $2800 $1000 to $1800

    The charts below show the price distribution for the Poodle and Wirehaired Pointing Griffon. For different price points, the charts show how many Poodle puppies or how many Wirehaired Pointing Griffon puppies are listed for sale at those price points.

    A breakdown of the prices of Poodles. The typical price range is shaded Green.

    A breakdown of the prices of Poodles. The typical price range is shaded Green.

    A breakdown of the prices of Wirehaired Pointing Griffons

    A breakdown of the prices of Wirehaired Pointing Griffons

    Note that a lot of factors determine how much you can expect to pay for the Poodle puppy or the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon puppy. This includes if health screening tests have been performed on the puppy, if the puppy is from a famous pedigree, the US State where the puppy is bred, etc.

    Nevertheless, when looking from a puppy, look at buying a puppy only from well-established breeders that breed puppies primarily for the love of dogs, and secondarily for profit. Do not buy a puppy from one of those puppy mills that mass-produce puppies in bad living conditions for maximum profit.

    You may also consider adopting a dog instead of buying a dog.

    The Intelligence of the Poodle versus the Intelligence of the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

    Poodle Wirehaired Pointing Griffon
    Intelligence Rank 2 out of 130 dog breeds 46 out of 130 dog breeds
    Trainability Tend To Learn New Commands After Fewer Than 5 Repetitions Tend To Learn New Commands After 25 To 40 Repetitions

    Professor Stanley Coren, the famous psychology/neuropsychological professor and, dog lover/trainer measured and ranked the intelligence of about 130 different dog breeds.

    According to Prof. Stanley Coren, the total intelligence that a dog demonstrates is the addition of three types of intelligence. These intelligence types are:

  • Instinctive Intelligence: This is the natural intelligence a dog has because of what the dog was bred for. This type of intelligence comes from instinct. For example, dog breeds that were bred for guarding will have high `guarding` instinctive intelligence, while dog breeds that were bred for hunting will what high `hunting` instinctive intelligence. However, you cannot compare the intelligence of dog breeds based on instinctive intelligence because such a comparison will not make sense.
  • Adaptive Intelligence (learning and problem-solving ability): This indicates what a dog can learn to do for himself or herself. It includes learning and benefiting from experience with his environment, solving new problems, and so forth. Adaptive intelligence is specific to each dog, and not breed specific. Thus, two dogs can have remarkably different levels of adaptive intelligence even if they are of the same breed.
  • Working/Obedience Intelligence: This intelligence is the closest to what we might call school-learning ability and it is based upon what the dog can learn to do when instructed by humans. Importantly, different dog breeds have different learning abilities. Also, science has shown that some dog breeds can learn faster than some other breeds. This means certain dog breeds tend to have higher working/obedience intelligence than some other breeds. Dogs with high Working/Obedience Intelligence are smart and easy to train.
  • Prof. Coren showed that the Working/Obedience Intelligence of different dog breeds can be measured reliably. Thus, he was able to rank different dog breeds based on their Working/Obedience Intelligence.

    This is important because according to Prof. Coren, 51 percent of a dog`s intelligence comes from its genes while 49 percent of a dog`s intelligence comes from the dog`s environmental circumstances.

    To rank the intelligence of dog breeds, Prof. Coren employed the help of 208 dog obedience judges in North America to fill out a detailed survey on dog obedience. This number represented more than half of all of these judges in North America at the time. He also employed 63 veterinarians and 14 guard dog experts to collect data on the personality of different dog breeds.

    Prof. Coren found that the Poodle has an obedience intelligence rank of 2 out of 130 dog breeds. The Poodle belongs to the `Brightest Dogs` category. This means that Poodles tend to learn new commands after fewer than 5 repetitions.

    The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon has an obedience intelligence rank of 46 out of 130 dog breeds. The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon belongs to the `Average Working/Obedience Intelligence Dogs` category. This means that Wirehaired Pointing Griffons tend to learn new commands after 25 to 40 repetitions.

    The Poodle is more intelligent than the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon.

    However, Prof. Coren noted that a dog should not be judged based on its intelligence alone, that other factors such as sociability, adorability, and compatibility with the owner are other very important factors that new dog owners need to consider when deciding on a new dog.

    The Popularity of Poodle versus Popularity of Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

    Every year, the American Kennel Club (AKC) publishes information on how popular a dog breed is in that particular year. The AKC gets the popularity information of a breed from how many dogs of that breed the owners register with the AKC every year. The AKC collects this data for about 200 dog breeds. The AKC collects this data for purebred dogs only(no mixed or hybrid dogs).

    The graphs and the table below show the popularity of the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon over the years.

    Based on the AKC popularity data over the years, the Poodle is more popular with dog owners than the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon. This is because, over the years, the average popularity of the Poodle is 7 out of about 200 dog breeds while the average popularity of the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon is 67 out of about 200 dog breeds.

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    Year Standard Poodle Popularity Rank Wirehaired Pointing Griffon Popularity Rank
    2013 8 80
    2014 7 76
    2015 8 66
    2016 7 66
    2017 7 65
    2018 7 65
    2019 6 62
    2020 6 63

    Health Problems of Poodle versus Health Problems of Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

    Every dog breed has its own set of health problems that it has a tendency to develop. There is nothing like a perfect dog breed.

    Both the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon are prone to certain genetic health conditions. The Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) is the organization that keeps track of health problems in dogs. Based on the extensive records that the OFA keeps, the OFA knows what health problems each dog breed is naturally prone to develop. Hence, the OFA recommends which health screening that breeders should perform on a dog breed to make sure that the breeders won`t breed `defective` dog parents that can pass down defective genes to their puppy offspring.

    The more health problems a dog breed is prone to develop, the more health tests the OFA will recommend for that dog breed.

    Based on our review of OFA records, we found that the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon is prone to the same number of genetic health problems as the Poodle.

    4 health tests are recommended for Poodle while 4 tests are recommended for the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon.

    Below is a detailed discussion of health problems in Poodles and in Wirehaired Pointing Griffons.

    Poodle Health Problems

    Poodles are genetically prone to certain health problems. However, breeders can reduce the chances of producing Poodle puppies with genetic defects by making sure that a puppy`s parents are free from genetic health problems before allowing the parent to make puppies.

    The OFA provides breeders recommendations on which genetic diseases that breeders should screen their dog parents and puppies for.

    If you want a Poodle puppy that will grow up to be healthy, make sure that your Poodle breeder screens your puppy or your puppy`s parents for the health problems that the OFA recommends for your puppy`s breed. This will increase the chances that your puppy is free from genetic defects.

    The following are the health tests that Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) recommends that breeders should screen Poodles for:

  • Eye Examination
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Patellar Luxation
  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) DNA Test
  • You can find out more about OFA`s recommended tests for Poodles here.

    Wirehaired Pointing Griffon Health Problems

    Wirehaired Pointing Griffons are genetically prone to certain health problems. However, breeders can reduce the chances of producing Wirehaired Pointing Griffon puppies with genetic defects by making sure that a puppy`s parents are free from genetic health problems before allowing the parent to make puppies.

    The OFA provides breeders recommendations on which genetic diseases that breeders should screen their dog parents and puppies for.

    If you want a Wirehaired Pointing Griffon puppy that will grow up to be healthy, make sure that your Wirehaired Pointing Griffon breeder screens your puppy or your puppy`s parents for the health problems that the OFA recommends for your puppy`s breed. This will increase the chances that your puppy is free from genetic defects.

    The following are the health tests that Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) recommends that breeders should screen Wirehaired Pointing Griffons for:

  • Autoimmune thyroiditis
  • Elbow Dysplasia
  • Eye Examination- after the age of 12 months
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • You can find out more about OFA`s recommended tests for Wirehaired Pointing Griffons here.

    More Discussions on Health Problems in Poodles and Wirehaired Pointing Griffons

    Based on our analysis of data from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals, of all known genetic health problems in dogs, the health problem that is most commonly seen in the Poodle Breed is Basic Cardiac problems.

    This is because the Poodle ranks 1 out of 16 dog breeds for Basic Cardiac problems. In fact, in a health test conducted on 270 Poodles, 2 of them had Basic Cardiac problems.

    The genetic diseases that were found to commonly occur in Poodles, and how common these diseases are in Poodles relative to other dog breeds, are given below:

  • Basic Cardiac problems: Rank 1 out of 16 Dog Breeds
  • Neonatal Encephalopathy W/Seizures problems: Rank 1 out of 1 Dog Breeds
  • Sebaceous Adenitis problems: Rank 1 out of 2 Dog Breeds
  • Chondrodystrophy (Cddy) problems: Rank 3 out of 5 Dog Breeds
  • Rcd4 Progressive Retinal Atrophy problems: Rank 4 out of 8 Dog Breeds
  • Von Willebrands problems: Rank 7 out of 15 Dog Breeds
  • Legg-Calve-Perthes problems: Rank 11 out of 40 Dog Breeds
  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy problems: Rank 14 out of 32 Dog Breeds
  • Dentition Database problems: Rank 21 out of 49 Dog Breeds
  • Advanced Cardiac problems: Rank 49 out of 71 Dog Breeds
  • Degenerative Myelopathy problems: Rank 57 out of 70 Dog Breeds
  • Patella problems: Rank 61 out of 145 Dog Breeds
  • Congenital Cardiac problems: Rank 73 out of 159 Dog Breeds
  • Thyroid problems: Rank 84 out of 115 Dog Breeds
  • Elbow problems: Rank 88 out of 144 Dog Breeds
  • Hips problems: Rank 100 out of 198 Dog Breeds
  • Eyes problems: Rank 127 out of 182 Dog Breeds
  • Based on our analysis of data from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals, of all known genetic health problems in dogs, the health problem that is most commonly seen in the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon Breed is Thyroid problems.

    This is because the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon ranks 21 out of 115 dog breeds for Thyroid problems. In fact, in a health test conducted on 285 Wirehaired Pointing Griffons, 21 of them had Thyroid problems.

    The genetic diseases that were found to commonly occur in Wirehaired Pointing Griffons, and how common these diseases are in Wirehaired Pointing Griffons relative to other dog breeds, are given below:

  • Thyroid problems: Rank 21 out of 115 Dog Breeds
  • Elbow problems: Rank 71 out of 144 Dog Breeds
  • Hips problems: Rank 132 out of 198 Dog Breeds
  • Eyes problems: Rank 152 out of 182 Dog Breeds
  • The table below lists the common health problems in Poodle and in Wirehaired Pointing Griffon and the rank (prevalence), compared to other dogs, of these health problems in the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon:

    Disease Poodle Rank Wirehaired Pointing Griffon Rank
    Basic Cardiac problems 1 out of 16 dog breeds Not Common
    Neonatal Encephalopathy W/Seizures problems 1 out of 1 dog breeds Not Common
    Sebaceous Adenitis problems 1 out of 2 dog breeds Not Common
    Chondrodystrophy (Cddy) problems 3 out of 5 dog breeds Not Common
    Rcd4 Progressive Retinal Atrophy problems 4 out of 8 dog breeds Not Common
    Von Willebrands problems 7 out of 15 dog breeds Not Common
    Legg-Calve-Perthes problems 11 out of 40 dog breeds Not Common
    Progressive Retinal Atrophy problems 14 out of 32 dog breeds Not Common
    Dentition Database problems 21 out of 49 dog breeds Not Common
    Advanced Cardiac problems 49 out of 71 dog breeds Not Common
    Degenerative Myelopathy problems 57 out of 70 dog breeds Not Common
    Patella problems 61 out of 145 dog breeds Not Common
    Congenital Cardiac problems 73 out of 159 dog breeds Not Common
    Thyroid problems 84 out of 115 dog breeds 21 out of 115 dog breeds
    Elbow problems 88 out of 144 dog breeds 71 out of 144 dog breeds
    Hips problems 100 out of 198 dog breeds 132 out of 198 dog breeds
    Eyes problems 127 out of 182 dog breeds 152 out of 182 dog breeds

    *To learn more about each of these diseases, go to OFA.org and search for the disease.

    Again, most of these health problems can be prevented through health screening. Responsible breeders screen male and female dog parents for genetic problems. These breeders will only breed dogs that are free of genetic defects. That way, there is little or no chance that their puppies will grow up to have genetic health problems. Always ask a breeder for the list of health tests the breeder screens their dogs for before buying a puppy from such a breeder.

    Tolerates Being Alone: Poodle versus Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

    Poodles do not like to be left alone.

    Poodles, by nature, are companion dogs. They like and thrive on human companionship more than most dog breeds. Poodles do not like to be left alone. Leaving a poodle alone for more than 4 hours day after day will cause separation anxiety and isolation distress in a poodle. If you plan to get a poodle, make sure you can be around your poodle most of the time, or arrange for a dog walker.

    See our article on how long you can leave a poodle alone.

    Wirehaired Pointing Griffons do not like to be left alone.

    Do Poodles shed more than Wirehaired Pointing Griffons?

    Poodles do not shed a lot. They are good for people with dog allergies.

    Although all dogs shed, and poodles are no different in this regard. But poodles shed less than many other breeds of dogs. However, if you own a poodle, you will not have the problem of having balls of dog hair on your couch and over your house. This is because the curly coat of the poodle traps the hair and other things that the poodle sheds. Therefore, people that are allergic to dogs tend to tolerate poodles better.

    Check out our articles to learn more on why poodles do not shed, and on standard poodle shedding, and on shedding in toy poodles

    Wirehaired Pointing Griffons do not shed a lot. They are good for people with dog allergies.

    Which is Easier to Groom, the Poodle or the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon?

    Poodles require a lot of grooming and they are not very easy to groom.

    To learn more about how to properly groom a poodle, check out our article on how to groom a poodle.

    Learn more on how to take care of a poodle here.

    Wirehaired Pointing Griffons are moderately easy to groom.

    Which Dog Breed is more Dog-Friendly, the Poodle or the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon?

    Poodles get along very well with other dogs.

    Poodles get along very well with other dogs. Poodles are very friendly. However, it is up to the other dog to reciprocate the friendliness. Some dog breeds are just unfriendly and aggressive.

    Read this article to learn about the dog breeds that get along well with poodle and the dog breeds that do not along with poodles.

    Wirehaired Pointing Griffons get along very well with other dogs.

    Are Poodles good family dogs? What about Wirehaired Pointing Griffons?

    Poodles are great family dogs. They are very affectionate with family.

    Poodles make a good addition to a family. They love kids and kids love them.

    Learn about standard poodles as family dogs here, and about how family-friendly are toy poodles here..

    Wirehaired Pointing Griffons are great family dogs. They are very affectionate with family.

    Is the Poodle Easier to Train than the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon?

    Poodles are very easy to train.

    Poodles are easy to train because they are intelligent and eager to please their owners. However, it is important that you begin training a poodle to make the most out of their natural intelligence. Moreover, training your Poodle should be based on positive reinforcement and repetition. Be sure to give your Poodle praise when he obeys a command and ignores your poodle`s bad behavior.

    To learn more, check out our article on how to train a poodle.

    Wirehaired Pointing Griffons are very easy to train.

    Which one drools more, the Poodle or the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

    Poodles do have a very low tendency to drool.

    Wirehaired Pointing Griffons do have a very low tendency to drool.

    How Kid-friendly are Poodles and Wirehaired Pointing Griffons?

    Poodles get along well with kids. They are kid-friendly.

    Wirehaired Pointing Griffons get along well with kids. They are kid-friendly.

    Does the Poodle Have a Higher Prey Drive than the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon?

    Poodles have a very low prey drive. This means they get won`t chase after smaller pets. They tend to get along well with other pets.

    Wirehaired Pointing Griffons have a high prey drive. They have the tendency to chase after smaller animals and pets. They do not get along well with other pets.

    Do Poodles Bark and Howl? What about Wirehaired Pointing Griffons?

    Poodles are not very vocal. They do not tend to bark and howl.

    Wirehaired Pointing Griffons are highly vocal. They have the tendency to bark and howl.

    Can Poodles Tolerate Cold Weather? And can Wirehaired Pointing Griffons Tolerate Cold Weather?

    Poodles can moderately tolerate cold weather.

    Wirehaired Pointing Griffons can very well tolerate cold weather.

    Wanderlust Potential: Poodle vs. Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

    Poodles have a moderate tendency to wander. This means that they sometimes get distracted by other animals or objects.

    Wirehaired Pointing Griffons have a high tendency to wander. They are easily distracted by other animals or objects.

    Can Poodles Tolerate Hot Weather? Can Wirehaired Pointing Griffons Tolerate Hot Weather?

    Poodles can tolerate hot weather.

    Wirehaired Pointing Griffons can tolerate hot weather as long as the weather is not too hot.

    Is the Poodle Better for Apartment Owners than the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon?

    Poodles adapt very well to apartment living.

    Wirehaired Pointing Griffons do not adapt well to apartment living.

    Which is Better for New Dog Owners, the Poodle or the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon?

    Poodles are very good for new dog owners.

    Wirehaired Pointing Griffons are OK for new dog owners.

    Poodle Versus Other Dog Breeds

    You may also be interested in how the poodle compares to other breeds aside from the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon. So, see below the links to the comparison of the poodle to other breeds:

    poodle versus Black and Tan Coonhound     poodle versus Bichon Frise     poodle versus Siberian Husky     poodle versus Belgian Tervuren     poodle versus Cavapoo     poodle versus Boykin Spaniel     poodle versus Airedale Terrier     poodle versus Alaskan Klee Kai     poodle versus Shih Tzu     poodle versus Rhodesian Ridgeback     

    Conclusion: Poodle versus Wirehaired Pointing Griffon. Which One is a Better Pet?

    In summary, there is nothing like a better dog breed or a worse dog breed. The important question to ask is which dog breed better matches your interests and lifestyle. We hope our discussion above will help you in deciding which dog breed between the Poodle and the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon better suits you and your family.